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Hasvik


Hasvik in Norway Hasvik municipality coat of arms

Population:
1,041

Areal:
556,2 km2


Hasvik Local Directory


Accommodation, Businesses and more pictures from Hasvik

Hasvik is situated on the western side of Norway´s fourth largest island (other than Svalbard) Sørøya. Sørøya is Norway´s fourth-largest island and is located along the western Finnmark coast - more precisely at 70.40° N. The island is divided between the two boroughs of Hasvik (the south-western region) and Hammerfest (in the north-east). Of the islands population, 93 % live in the borough of Hasvik, which comprises the three main villages of Hasvik in the south, Sørvær at the western tip and Breivikbotn within the Breivikfjord between the two villages. Sørøya is often claimed to be one of the most beautiful of the islands in Norway.

HASVIK

With about 400 residents, Hasvik is the hub of Sørøya´s community. Most people are to be found in a string of settlements along the western coast: Breivikbotn and Hasvik being the main ones. The administrative centre of the municipality is the village of Breivikbotn. The population is in steady decline, due to the problems within the fishing industry. In Hasvik, you will also find a recently renovated health centre, the local police station (ligningskontoret, trygdekontoret), and several different schools from Kindergarten stage.

Here you will find the airport with twice-daily flights between the mainland (once during weekends), linking Hammerfest and Tromsø with comfortable ease. There is also a daily car ferry connection to Øksfjord, as well as a speedboat connection between Hammerfest every Friday. Hasvik Airport is served with regular connections to Tromsø and Hammerfest, and there is a two-hour ferry crossing to Øksfjord, providing access by car.

BREIVIKBOTN

Breivikbotn, located 17 km from Hasvik, has a population of approximately 300 and is the youngest village in the borough. Breivikbotn is the seat of administration that includes the Town Hall. As a result of its location within the bay of the Breivikfjord, the town is somewhat sheltered from the elements. Breivikbotn is well visited by geologists, hunters, and is a popular place for photo hunting. Plenty of wildlife. The place is in the fall and winter, a good place to hunt extreme weather and the Northern Lights. There are buses to the village Hasvik, where you can go on to Hammerfest by air or fast, Or you can take the plane or ferry. Whether to Øsfjord where it is on road with the rest of the world, or fly to Hammerfest or Tromsø.

The Breivikfjord is nicknamed "Lofoten in miniature" because of its rich fishing grounds and resemblance to the fjords typical to the Lofoten area. The annual cod fishing season from the end of February until the beginning of May draws commercial fishing boats from near and far. The local fishing fleet is the major source of income.

SØRVÆR

Sørvær is approximately 40 km from Hasvik and has a population of about 200. Sørvær has throughout its history been a typical fishing village in which most of the population depend upon its maritime resources. Situated on three small barren islets, making agriculture virtually impossible, fishing has become the only source of income throughout the centuries. In the sea off of the village of Sørvær lies the stranded Soviet cruiser Murmansk, which ran aground on Christmas Eve in 1994 after her towlines snapped off North Cape. She was on her way to India to be scrapped at the time. Several attempts has been made to pull her free, but failed. She has now become something of a tourist attraction. However, she is currently being scrapped, the work is planned to be finished by 2012. The Sørvær dialect varies from that spoken in Hasvik and Breivikbotn, since it has been significantly influenced by commercial fishermen from northern Troms, who came here to fish for spawning cod. The Sørvær deep-sea fishing tournament is held each year and is part of "Sørøydagene", a summer festival each July. During this period, the small village is full of festivity!

SØRØYA

Sørøya is Norway´s fourth largest island, area-wise, and is shared by the municipalities of Hasvik and Hammerfest. Its total area is 811.4 km² and precisely located at 70.40° N. The island is divided between the two boroughs of Hasvik (the south-western region) and Hammerfest (in the north-east). Of the islands population, 93 % live in the borough of Hasvik, which comprises the three main villages of Hasvik in the south, Sørvær at the western tip and Breivikbotn within the Breivikfjord between the two villages.

Sørøya is often claimed to be "one of the most beautiful" of the islands in Norway. The island´s landscape is open and practically free of any trees. It has a beautiful landscape to hike in with many good fishing lakes. Sørøya is often called "The green isle of the North". The island is surrounded by the Norwegian Sea to the north and the Sørøysundet to the south. Across the Sørøysundet are three large islands: Stjernøya, Seiland and Kvaløya. The island of Sørøya has no bridge or tunnel access, only a regular ferry route from Hasvik to Øksfjord on the mainland. Hasvik Airport is located on the southern tip of the island. The area is known as one of Europe´s best for seafishing.

SØRØYDAGENE (Sørøya Days)

Each year in July, the "Sørøydagene", a week-long festival with lots of activities for all ages, is being arranged. Over the years, the "Sørøydagene" have become the most important event of the year for both the locals and guests from other parts of Norway and abroad. "Sørøydagene" offer a wide range of activities. Here are some highlights from former years: Deep Sea Fishing Festival, fishing match for children, children´s day at the beach in Sandvika, football class for children, computer-based activities for young people, open house at the Red Cross´ cabin, open house at the Hammerfest electrical plant, open day at the borough of Hasvik, open-air divine service, soccer match, hikes, bike race, marathon run, cake feasts, treasure hunts for children, exhibition of photographs, fun fair, concert and memorial service in the Kvithell cave, Sørøy Rock, art exhibition and much, much more.

MIDNIGHT SUN

We have the Midnight Sun in our region from 20th May - 20th July. During this period, the sun stays above the horizon, and it is light 24 hours a day. The sky must be clear and there must be unobstructed visibility northwards in order to see the Midnight Sun. A summer night on the fjord or in the mountains is an experience not to be missed, you can go fishing in the fjord, which contains splendid variation of fish, or you can take a walk in the wilderness surrounding.

NORTHERN LIGHTS

Aurora Borealis is the Latin name for the Northern Lights – solar winds that meet the atmosphere in a zone around the magnetic North Pole. The Northern Lights are only visible when the sky is dark and clear, from August to April, and they are most intense from 10 pm to midnight. The region on the 700 northern latitude is a fantastic place for experiencing the beautiful and intense play of colours given off by the Northern Lights.

POLAR NIGHT

The dark time, or the long, dark Polar Night, lasts from 30th November - 12th January - there is only a twilight-dusk type of light (the blue light) for a few hours during the middle of the day. This does not mean that it becomes totally dark, however. The aurora borealis trails its multicoloured banner across the sky and the moon lights the scene just like the nightlight of Our Lord. The experience of the winter with the uniqueness of the light, the northern lights and snow is fantastic. Especially beautiful is the blue light southwards, just before it becomes dark.

PICTURES

Pictures taken by amateur photograps of local scenery worth seeing. GoNorway want to show pictures of good quality taken by anyone. Click on the small images and get a large image with a map and a txt of what you see. The photographers name with link to their Homepage, Facebook, Twitter and video on YouTube.

FISHING

The Breivikfjord is nicknamed "Lofoten in miniature" because of its rich fishing grounds and resemblance to the fjords typical to the Lofoten area. The annual cod fishing season from the end of February until the beginning of May draws commercial fishing boats from near and far. The local fishing fleet is the major source of income.

The Sørvær deep-sea fishing tournament is held each year and is part of "Sørøydagene", a summer festival each July. The fishing tournament takes place over two days (Friday and Sunday) and experienced anglers from all over Norway compete alongside the local fishermen.

German Michael Eisele was fishing outside Sørøya in Breiviksfjorden in April 2013 and caught the biggest fish ever caught on rod. The cod weighed 47 kg and was 160 centimeters long.

GOLF

Golfclubs in Troms and Finnmark.