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A presentation of Norwegian food and beverages and in which county they are consider a speciality. Norway is divided into 19 countys. Each County is divided into different municipality (430 for the whole country).

From Authentic Norwegian Cooking by Astrid Karlsen Scott. Photo by Per Eide and Bengt Wilson




HASSELBACK (Roasted) Potatoes

The easy way to prepare potatoes is becoming increasingly popular in Norway. And it is simply delicious. One I watched a Norwegian chef place a peeled potato in the hollow of a large wooden spoon, and began to slice it in 1/8 inch (1/4/ cm) slices till about 1/2 inch (1 1/4) cm) from the end. (The spoon prevented the knife from slicing all the way through the potato.) So easy! Preheat oven to 425 F (215 C).

  • 4 oval baking potatoes, medium
  • 1 T butter
  • 2 T butter, melted
  • Jarlsberg cheese, grated
  • Paprika

As you peel the potatoes, drop them into the cold water to prevent discoloring. Slice as explained above. Butter an oven-proof dish. Drain the potatoes and pat them dry with a paper towel. Place the potatoes side by side, cut side up, in the dish brushed with butter. Brush the potatoes with melted butter and sprinkle with salt. If needed, brush again with melted butter after 30 minutes. About 5 minutes before they are baked, sprinkle with grated cheese and paprika. Total baking time 50 minutes. Serves 4.





CREAMED PEAS (Grønn ertestuing)

It is amazing how inexpensive, traditional, good food can be. I remember these creamed peas served with mama´s delectable meatballs (they taste good with any meat), or when we ate lutefisk. The dried peas only cost pennies a pound. If unavailable at your food market, check out your Scandinavian delicatessen or natural food stores.

  • 2 cups (5 dl) dried peas
  • 1 quart (liter) water
  • 3 T. butter
  • 3 T. flour
  • 2 tsp. salt or more
  • 1 tsp. sugar

Rinse the peas well and pick out any foreign objects. Place in water to soak overnight in a cool place. Let them simmer in the water they were soaked in, approximately 1 1/2 to 2 hours. Mix the flour with the butter and add to the peas and let simmer about 10 minutes longer. Add salt and sugar to taste. If you wish you may add a peeled or diced carrot to the peas during the last 1/2 hour of cooking. No sugar is needed if you add a carrot.





RAE POTATO DUMPLINGS (klubb, kumle, kumpe)

This dish is well known all over Norway, and its names and recipes vary from district to district. The foundation of these dumplings is potatoes with variations achieved by adding different ingredients. In eastern Norway klubben is made from barley and pea flour and eaten with myssmordupp (a sauce of soft cheese made from whey). On the southern coast these dumplings are called kumpe, and further north they are known as ball. Ball is often served with fish. Generally this type of dumpling is large - about the size of a medium size apple. These old, traditional dumplings have numerous stalwart fans.

Potato Dumplings from Agder (kumpe fra Agder)

Grate potatoes, drain most of the liquid and add enough barley flour or other flour until the dough is firm. Add a little salt. From into round or oblong shapes with your hands, enclosing a piece of bacon or suet in the center of each dumpling. Simmer dumplings in lightly salted water 1/2 to 3/4 hours, depending on size. Cold dumplings may be sliced and fried in bacon drippings.

Potato Dumplings with Bacon, North Norway (klubb og fett, Nord Norge)

Grate potatoes and blend with barley flour until a proper consistency. Some ground, boiled potatoes and a little salt may be added. Form round or oblong dumplings with your hand. Bring salted water to a boil, add dumplings and simmer until done. Serve with boiled rutabagas and fried bacon. Some people enjoy these dumplings served with soup.

Potato Dumplings From Ryfylke (klimpor fra Ryfylke)

These dumplings are smaller and were used in meat soups at banquets and weddings. Follow directions for previously described dumplings but use white flour, boiled potatoes, a little salt, sugar and cinnamon. The addition of an egg is optional. Klimpor may also be cooked in milk.





RUTABAGAS (Kålrot)

The summer of my ninth year, my sister Eva and I weeded our neighbor farmer´s rutabaga fields. We joined nine other young people, all older than I, at Mellom-Granerud farm on Nesodden. We rode in a rickety hay wagon pulled by a large, stocky horse.

The vegetable fields seemed to stretch endlessly. We started to work at 9 a.m. and worked with great enthusiasm until the lunch bell rang. It was wartime in Norway, and food was scarce. However, this lunch was a feast, with meat, boiled potatoes, gravy, and mashed rutabagas with nutmeg. I have loved rutabagas from that day. When I worked in the rutabaga fields, I knew nothing of their value. Most of the rutabagas where cattle and horse feed. Lucky animals!

Many people shun this lowly vegetable, not knowing how to prepare it; however, it can be prepared any number of ways to complement numerous recipes. Remember to wash the rutabagas thoroughly, slice in thickness desired, and peel.

This unpretentious, tasty vegetable supplies vitamin A (carotene(, minerals, and 45 milligrams of vitamin C in 3,5 ounces (100 g), about our minimum daily requirement. It tastes good raw, in salads, or with other vegetable snacks, cooked, or fried in slices, and keeps well. It has earned the name, "orange of the North."





COTTER´S KETTLE (Husmannsgryte)

If you are concerned about preparing a nutritious meal and there is not time to cook, try this recipe. It is bursting with nutritious, colorful vegetables.

  • 1 bouillon cube
  • 3/4 cup (1 3/4 dl) boiling water
  • 2 large carrots, sliced
  • 1 large leek, sliced, including the green
  • 1 1/2 cups (3 1/2 dl) rutabagas, cubed
  • 3/4 lb. (340 g) medisterpølse or bratwurst
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Dissolve bouillon in boiling water. Add all the vegetables and let simmer 15?20 minutes or until vegetables are barely done. Remove skin from sausage, cut in thick slices, and add to vegetables. Add mustard, salt and pepper, and let is simmer covered for a few more minutes. Do not overcook. Serve with mustard, potatoes, and dark bread.








BOILED / STEAMED POTATOS
(Kokte melne poteter)


Bring water to a boil and add even-sized potatoes. Just enough water to cover. If the potatoes are unpeeled, you do not need salt in the water. (Obviously cooking the potatoes with the peel on saves nutrition.)

Quickly bring thinly peeled potatoes to a boil and cook until easily penetrated by the tip of a sharp knife, about 20 to 30 minutes. Let simmer, do no overcook or they will become soggy and fall apart easily. Drain immediately. Return to low burner, shake pan gently to prevent sticking, and continue steaming until ready to serve.

Note: The potatoes will not stay mealy if cooled and reheated.



KLUBB, KUMLE, KUMPE
Rae Potato Dumplings

This dish is well known all over Norway, and its names and recipes vary from district to district. The foundation of these dumplings is potatoes with variations achieved by adding different ingredients.

In eastern Norway klubben is made from barley and pea flour and eaten with myssmordupp (a sauce of soft cheese made from whey). On the southern coast these dumplings are called kumpe, and further north they are known as ball.

Ball is often served with fish. Generally this type of dumpling is large - about the size of a medium size apple. These old, traditional dumplings have numerous stalwart fans.

Potato Dumplings from Agder (kumpe fra Agder), Potato Dumplings with Bacon, North Norway (klubb og fett, Nord Norge), Potato Dumplings From Ryfylke (klimpor fra Ryfylke).